NASE Marketing & Advertising Blog

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Sunday, November 16, 2014
Notice the advertising done by other successful companies in your industry. Also, understand that there is a difference between a company that’s been in business many years and may have $50MM in sales, and your start-up company. They have built their brand and are getting volume discounts. Join professional trade associations and learn from them. Do your homework. Consult professionals. Every industry is different and your creative message and your selection of media channels must resonate with your target audience. Determine your budget and test one channel at a time and do it well, rather than diluting your budget across ...
Sunday, November 16, 2014
Because television covers a wide area, you need multiple locations, or sales people that work the entire area where your commercials will be broadcast. As with any media you need to have frequency and consistency, but first you need to calculate is your product/service a fit for television. You should determine your total media cost and how many leads and sales you need to ensure success. If your media cost is $10,000 and the average profit on your sale is $1200 – you need 8.33 sales to break even. If you’re doing direct response television, you need to ensure you ...
Sunday, November 16, 2014
Let’s look at the numbers. How many were mailed, how many responded, how many closed? What were the criteria of your mailing list and what was your mailing list source? Do you have proof of mailing from your printer or letter shop (generally this is a USPS form 3602 – or ‘Proof of Mailing’ stamped by USPS). Did you have a strong offer? What were other incentives for recipients to respond? Was this the first mailing to this specific list? Just because a mailing didn’t work, doesn’t mean mail can’t work but there are many steps to implement to ensure ...
Sunday, November 16, 2014
Yes and no. It depends on your overall objective. If you wish to build your brand and become a well-known and respected name in your area or your industry, you will want to put some standards into place – such as a graphics standards manual. If you provide each manager with your graphic/brand standards as well as approved ads for different advertising channels, you will be able to better control your brand, and be perceived as professional. Your managers can use pre-approved materials at their discretion, or follow the graphic standards manual to create their own ads.
Sunday, November 16, 2014
The cost of producing a brochure is largely based on quantity produced (the more you print, the less the unit price) as well as the size and specifications of the brochure. A professional graphic designer experienced in creating ‘print ready’ art can cost between $35 and $150 an hour. The more information you provide at the outset of the project, the fewer hours you will incur. A full color brochure will be more expensive than a 2 color brochure. An elaborate large multi-page coil bound brochure will be more expensive than an 8.5x11 trifold brochure. Prices can range from .25 ...
Sunday, November 16, 2014
No. Think of print shops like auto repair shops. You wouldn’t take your 1982 Malibu Classic to the Mercedes dealership for repairs. Print shops have very specific types of equipment. Two color presses, four color presses, eight color presses. Printing presses vary in size and speed. There are digital presses and offset presses. Unless you have a good understanding of printing press capabilities, the best way to find an appropriate shop is by requesting a competitive quote by detailing all the specifications of your job. (A professional print quote form can be provided upon request.)
Sunday, November 16, 2014
Cost is driven by volume, design, how specific your mailing list is, as well as postage. A multipage brochure in a large envelope could $5-10 dollars each on a small mailing. A simple letter in an envelope to your house database – if you’re mailing a larger quantity could cost .50 each.
Sunday, November 16, 2014
This depends on several factors.  For instance - your reason for mailing, your target market and the size town you’re mailing into.  If you’re promoting an event in a small town – one time may be sufficient.  If you’re a new business and building a brand, multiple times will reap the most benefits.  As a general rule, a person does not respond without being presented an opportunity at least 3 times.  This does however depend on the offer and the sense of urgency conveyed.  If you are a timeshare offering a free cruise and there is a response deadline, you ...
Sunday, November 16, 2014
Direct marketing/advertising is specifically designed to be trackable, There is a specific call to action – to bring something in or to connect in some way, mentioning the specific offer advertised.   Trained staff is key to tracking – and key to ensuring your advertising is working. Any time a prospect contacts your company, appropriate questions must be asked to understand how the caller learned of your company or the offer. Careful tracking, then tabulation of all leads from all sources can be assigned to the dollars spent from the different ad sources.
Sunday, November 16, 2014
This will vary depending on a number of factors.  However if you are mailing to a prospect list (versus your house list) 1% is considered ‘good’.  However, response rates may be considerably lower the first and second time you mail.  Generally the third mailing to the same list with an excellent offer will produce the best response rate.
Sunday, November 16, 2014
This varies according to industry.  Industry associations may provide marketing expenditures as a percentage of revenue. Public companies in your industry may give a figure for their marketing spending in their financial statements (found in their annual reports). With a simple calculation, you can determine what percentage of their overall revenue that represents. A significant difference is businesses that are volume driven versus margin driven.  For instance, WalMart is volume driven thus spend .04% on advertising.  A more upscale store that is less volume driven like Macys may spend 5%.  Service oriented businesses generally start at 5%, although 15% for ...
Sunday, November 16, 2014
If depends on what you need to achieve?  If you are incorporating ecommerce, database management, many pages, video – then perhaps.  If you’re doing a simple 4 or 5 page website you could spend considerably less.
Sunday, November 16, 2014
Your logo colors are important for a variety of reasons.  When choosing your colors, you should consider your target customer, your industry, your competition and trends.  Understand the psychology behind colors and how different colors are perceived differently.  Choose colors that will achieve your objective.  Do you want your prospect to feel assured, or motivated? Do you want them to have a sense of urgency or a sense of playfulness? Study non-competing companies you admire and respect, and that achieve the same objective you wish to achieve.  Be careful of trends.
Sunday, November 16, 2014
Postcards do work for some types of business. It all depends on what you are selling, and your target audience. Postcards work well if you’re a retailer, if you’re promoting an event, offering dry cleaning, real estate, or an oil change – to name a few.  However, if you’re selling a product or service that is of a financial, medical or consulting type nature; an envelope is the best choice.  Envelopes are usually perceived as ‘important’ or ‘personal’ mail.  Recipients sort their mail and treat it accordingly. If the postcard costs less but doesn’t generate a response, then it wasn’t ...

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